From LGBTQ

Letter to Bay Windows

Dear Bay Windows,

As a white lesbian and longtime reader of Bay Windows, I was dismayed by Sue O’Connell’s August 8 editorial, “Sharing our Experience.” Ms. O’Connell equates the struggle of the GLBT community with that of people of color. In a country where black people were enslaved for three hundred years, lynched, and oppressed under Jim Crow, and today are disproportionately poor, in ill health and incarcerated, this comparison is senseless. Ms. O’Connell suggests—despite her disclaimers to the contrary—that young black men should overcome racism by showing the dominant culture how “presentable” they can be. This is a losing proposition. No degree of “presentability” (read: assimilation to white norms) will keep a young man of color from being judged as less than equal in this society. The problem is not young black men, it is white America. Racism is a white problem and we are the ones who must change, not the victims of our personal and, more importantly, institutional biases.

Sincerely,
Cathy Jacobowitz
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Magazine roundup

Three things that came to my eye recently.

For an item about Gabby Douglas, Us Weekly went the euphemism route:

GABBY’S SAD PAST
Before Olympic gymnast Gabby Douglas, 16, won gold, she nearly quit the sport because of bullying. In 2010, she says, a staffer at Excalibur Gymnastics in Virginia Beach told her to get a nose job . . .

I believe that kind of bullying is called “racism.” Read more

But shame is worthy of Mass

Friend and neighbor J-Mac reads the Globe:

The Catholic Archdiocese of Boston, in response to criticism it was sanctioning a celebration of Gay Pride month, announced yesterday that it had ordered a South End church to cancel a Mass scheduled for next weekend that was themed, “All are Welcome.”

The church is St. Cecilia’s, where this pinko Jew lesbian agnostic feels welcomed and loved. Read more

I’m so proud!

Brad Sears named Assistant Dean at UCLA Law School. He says:

This is exactly what I wanted to do ever since high school. I come from a small town of 90 people in Missouri, right outside of Kansas City. . . . I started working on LGBT issues in college . . .

It’s true. He once scaled the Yale Career Services building in the middle of the night to hang a banner reading “Careers For Queers” from the roof.